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    1. (LRR) Windows 10 Setup Guide - SafeDisc Version

      By JimbobJeffers,
      This tutorial will show you how to install a SafeDisc protected version of LEGO Rock Raiders on Windows 10, without having to use a virtual machine or crack the executable.
       
      Please keep in mind that LEGO Rock Raiders is highly unpredictable, hence we currently have 16 pages of topics for it in the Support section. You're almost guaranteed to have something go wrong, so please check out the Support Forum to see if your issue has already been fixed.
       
      Setup
      1. Insert the LEGO Rock Raiders disc into your PC. Open This PC/My Computer, right-click on the disc and select "Run enhanced content".
       

       
      2. Follow through the installation procedure, choosing "No, I will restart my computer later" and clicking "Finish" when it is complete.
       

       
      3. A common issue with LEGO Rock Raiders is that d3drm.dll is reported missing, so download it here, extract the file and place it in your install directory. For me, that's: C:\Program Files (x86)\LEGO Media\Games\Rock Raiders
       

       
       
      4. It is also a good idea to give LEGO Rock Raiders administrative privileges. Right-click on "LegoRR.exe", select "Properties", enter the "Compatibility" tab and tick "Run this program as an administrator".
       

       
       
      5. LEGO Rock Raiders uses SafeDisc protection, which is no longer supported in Windows 10. You can however re-enable the driver that SafeDisc uses, but only do so when you wish to play LEGO Rock Raiders and other trusted games as it was removed for a reason.
       
      Open a folder in Windows Explorer, such as Documents. Click “File”, then mouse over “Open command prompt” and choose “Open command prompt as administrator”.
       

       
       
      6. Type in (without quotes) “bcdedit /set TESTSIGNING ON”. Press enter and it will state “This operation completed successfully.” Now you can close the command prompt.
       

       
       
      7. Download this file, extract it and place the “SECDRV.SYS” file into the following location: C:\Windows\System32\drivers. Then restart your computer.

      8. Upon logging back in, you should see text in the lower-right corner of your desktop, along the lines of “Test Mode Windows 10 Home” with some random nonsense after. 
       
      You will need the Driver Signature Enforcement Overrider to actually make the SECDRV.SYS driver work. Go to this page and click “Download Now”.
       

       
      Right click dseo13b.exe and select “Run as administrator”. Press Next, then Yes, and you’ll be at the main menu. Check “Sign a System File” and press Next. Now you will need to type in the location of the SECDRV.SYS file, which should be: C:\Windows\System32\drivers\SECDRV.SYS. Click OK and OK again, then in the main menu check “Exit” and press Next.

      Now you can play LEGO Rock Raiders! If you’d like to play it in higher resolutions including widescreen, click here to check out Cafeteria.
       
      When you’ve finished, follow steps 5-6, this time entering “bcdedit /set TESTSIGNING OFF”. Reboot the computer and it will be back to normal, with LEGO Rock Raiders not launching again.

      In future you will need to follow steps 5, 6 and the latter part of 8 - enabling test mode, rebooting into it and signing the driver - whenever you wish to play the game, but it’s far less hassle than using a virtual machine or transferring files to an old XP computer if you're modding.
    2. Run Rock Raiders In Windowed Mode

      By Cyrem,
      LEGO Rock Raiders was mainly designed to run in fullscreen mode. However the developers did allow the game to run within a window. This guide will show you how to run the game within a window.
       
      LEGO Rock Raiders was developed in a time when 16bit colour mode was common, but these days the majority of devices run in 32bit colour mode. To run the game in windowed mode we will actually need to be in 16bit colour mode, which is supported by all current Windows systems in some form as long as your Monitor and Graphics Card also support this lower colour mode. Below you will find sections for the most popular versions of Windows which you can follow. Afterwards, jump to the "Running the Game" section at the end of the guide.
       
       
      Windows 8 & Windows 10  
      The later versions of Windows, Microsoft introduced colour emulation on a per-application basis to support older software that cannot be run in a 32bit colour environment. This is actually quite helpful and makes things easier than in versions of Windows prior.
      Step 1
      Firstly Locate your LEGO Rock Raiders Executable file (named LegoRR.exe). This will be found in the folder where you installed the game, usually: c:\Program Files(x86)\LEGO Media\Games\Rock Raiders. Right click on this file and select "Properties" from the menu.
      Step 2
      On the Properties dialog, click the "Compatibility" tab. About midway, you will see a setting called "Reduced Colour Mode". Enable this and change it to 16 Bit.
      Step 3
      Press "Apply" to apply the new settings.
       

       
      Windows 7  
      This of Windows doesn’t support application colour emulation that newer versions support, so in order to do this we’ll need to change our monitor colour settings.
       
      Step 1
      Firstly, right-click on your Desktop and click "Screen Resolution" from the menu that appears.
       
      Step 2
      On the Screen Resolution dialog, click "Advanced Settings". (Note that if you have more than one screen you may need to make this change for both of your screens)
       
      Step 3
      On the Advanced Settings dialog, click the "Monitor" tab. Next, change "Colours" from "True Color (32 Bit)" to "High Color (16 Bit)".
       
      Step 4
      Press "Apply" to apply the new colour settings.
       

       
       
      Windows XP
      Windows XP was a great system back in the day and it will be the final version of Windows I will consider in the guide. If you're still running this as a main operating system today, I'm impressed.
       
      Step 1
      Open your Display Properties window. On many machines using Microsoft Windows you can do this by right-clicking on your desktop and selecting "properties" from the menu.
       
      Step 2
      From in that window click on the combo box which has the text "Highest (32 bit)" and select "Medium (16 bit)" from the list.
       
      Step 3
      Press "Apply" to apply the new colour settings.
       


       
      Running the Game
      Alright, you're set and ready to Rock Raiders! Now all we have to do is run the game in Windowed Mode. To do this, go to the LEGO Rock Raiders folder usually located in "c:\Program Files(x86)\LEGO Media\Games\Rock Raiders" and double click on the "LegoRR.exe" file, this is the game.
       
      Next you will notice a window popup with game display properties. On the left select the "Window" option from the list. Then click "OK" to run the game.
       

       
      Final Notes
      Hopefully this has helped you run your game. There are however to important notes to consider. First, don't run the game from either of the Shortcuts created by the game's installer, this will bypass the "Mode Selection" Window. Secondly, if the "OK" button is disabled after clicking "Window", it means you haven't correctly set/run the game in 16bit colour mode, go back through the steps above to try again.
       
    3. Animated Textures on Models

      By Cirevam,
      Animated textures (aka "sequenced textures") on models are possible now. It's simple to do but is limited by animations. This video will show you the basics. You can grab the blinking raiders patch here.
       
       
      Guide Transcript
      Hello Rock Raiders. Today I'm going to show you a new kind of mod available in Lego Rock Raiders: sequenced textures. This is something that was previously locked out of the Rock Raiders modding community due to modern versions of Lightwave not exporting the necessary information to make the textures work. Big thanks to @Yellowkey for pointing me to the bits that needed to be edited in order to make this possible.
       
      What are sequenced textures? They are simply animated textures, and the game uses them to great effect already. You can see them in smoke effects and a few particles, but they're not used much beyond that. They can be potentially used on almost any sort of object, but there are a few requirements. I'll go over those before diving into the details.
       
      The following conditions must be met in order for a model to support a sequenced texture:
       
      The texture files must end with numbers, usually starting with 0000 and increasing by one for each frame, though it is possible to use three numbers and not start with all zeros. The model must be directly included in an animation file. The model's texture definitions must specify the texture as sequenced.
      The first condition is evident where sequences textures are already used. You can look in the World\Shared folder and find textures like Adst001 and ssss0000. These are textures used for various smoke and steam effects, and each file represents one frame of animation. The game automatically finds the beginning and end of each set of images like this, so you do not have to define anything besides the name of the first file.
       
      The second condition is trickier since it's not obvious just by looking at an object. I say "object" instead of "model" here as some objects, like vehicles and monsters, are created using several models that are combined in an animation file. Other objects like crystals, ore, and electric fences are not contained in animation files and cannot use sequenced textures. This also extends to vehicle wheels and upgradeable parts like drills, as they are added on top of the vehicle within the game. They do not exist in the actual animation file. It's possible to check this yourself by opening the animation file, or LWS file, in Notepad and look for the model. If it's defined in the animation, it's ready to accept sequenced textures.
       
      Lastly, the model must specify that its textures are sequenced. This part requires a bit of work, as the only known legal method of inserting this information requires a hex editor. The other method involves flying to Denmark and retrieving the source code from LEGO's vault, which might only be possible if you're a member of the Alpha Team. Luckily, we've identified the values that you need to edit, and it's not hard once you know what to change. This is a mod that anybody can do.
       
      Here I have two models opened side by side in a hex editor. I personally use XVI32, but any hex editor should work. Do you notice some of the differences already? There are four values you have to change. The first three are quite subtle: FORM, which is four bytes long and reflects the total length of the file; SURF, which is also four bytes long and reflects the length of the surface for the texture; and TIMG, which is two bytes long and reflects the length of the file path for the texture's first file. You also have to change the file path to include the text " (sequence)" at the end, and that includes the space in front. This is what tells the game to start animating the texture. You can't stop at that change, as the model will be considered invalid if you do not adjust the lengths in FORM, SURF, and TIMG. All lengths are defined in hexadecimal, so you must either convert them to decimal, add 11, then convert back to hexadecimal, or directly add 0x0B to each number. Note that you must add multiples of this number to FORM for each sequenced texture in the model, as it reflects the entire file length. We are editing two textures in this example, so you must add 22 or 0x16 to FORM. The Windows calculator has a programmer mode which allows you to switch between the two types with a single click. This may be the easiest if you are not familiar with hexadecimal.
       
      Be careful when changing the numbers in the file. Remember that each letter on the right is represented by two hex numbers on the left. If your calculator shows a three digit number, like 1A3, you must add a leading zero when typing it in. Thus 1A3 becomes 01A3. Also remember to overwrite the existing numbers instead of adding new ones in place, or the file will be considered invalid. And always ALWAYS backup your files before doing changes like this.
       
      Alright, we're done. Let's see what it looks like in-game. This model has two planes, with the left plane counting from zero to 24, and the right plane counting from zero to three. The framerate is defined by the global timer, which runs at 25 frames per second. I've slowed the game time down so you can see how the numbers get out of sync with each other, but they always change to the next frame on each tick of the global timer. Please note how the right plane resets to zero early at times. This is because the texture sequence starts over when the animation loops. This leads to odd effects, such as here, where the minifigs only blink when they're doing something other than standing. The standing animation is zero frames long, and the blinking texture is 41 frames long. The blinking does not start until frame 27, so any animation that is not at least that long will not blink.
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